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FO Report: Slippin’

I finished my Great Sock Project and found myself without anything on the needles. While dithering and indecisive, the solution landed on my feet. Or around them. Not sure: the point is I’m cold. I made a pair of felted clogs years ago (back in the early days of the blog, actually), and have long walked thorugh them — turns out I had enough feltable yarn to get back in business.

A sizeable start

A sizeable start

I love this pattern: I’ve made it about six times, twice for me and a few times for others, and it’s always a bit magic. They’re incredibly fast to knit — it took me about a week to make both slippers, but I didn’t knit them every day. And you end up with a pair of huge footbags.

'yuuuuge!

‘yuuuuge!

Then the second round of magic: felting. There are loads of guides to felting online, so I won’t go into much detail. Actually, there isn’t much. I stuffed each slipper with a scrunched-up plastic bag to stop it felting shut, and then put both in a zippered pillowcase, divided by a rubber band (so each slipper was in its own little stable and they wouldn’t merge into one awkward unislipper). Then into the washing machine with the rest of the washing!

These were actually quite damp.

These were actually quite damp.

Three cycles later: they’re damp but tiny, to match my tiny but damp feet! I put them on and wore them while they dried, to help them dry into a comfy foot shape, and voila! New clogs! Super speedy, dead comfy. You certainly get a more refined result if you do them in a top-loader: you can take them out every so often and give them a yank and try them on and make sure they’re felting to an even, shapely form. But I’ve got a front-loader, which means no stopping till it stops, and it still worked fine.

Snugasaurus

Snugasaurus

Here’s the specs:
Pattern: Fiber Trends Felted Clogs by Bev Galeskas — easy and fun.
Yarn: Cascade 220 in colours whose names have been lost to the erosion of time. Cascade 220 is excellent for felting: it felts evenly and reliably, and keeps its colour. A really good yarn.

PS: a last thought is that there won’t be many felting projects in my future. I’ve stopped buying animal fibres, and plant and synthetic fibres generally don’t felt (although they might shrink a little). I think that’s fine: I like my felted slippers, but I’ve got plenty of other ideas for keeping warm the feets!

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