Skip to content

[Winter-related metaphor-based title not found]

I love winter: it’s grey and breezy and sweetly cool, and the nights are cold and good for sleeping.

Cycle of life, dudes.

I love the poetry of the world turning inward and resting; a cycle of inner growth and patience, etc.

zzzz...

 

But I’ve been reading foodgawker.com, and it is pretty damn clear that in the Northern Hemisphere, it’s summertime. And in the food blogging world, summertime means…well, I had gimp open anyway, so here’s an artist’s depiction of food blogging in summer:

WHEEEE!

Everywhere I look, there are posts like “how to use up those excess strawberries!” and “What should I do with twelve kilos of peaches glowing like juicy pagan gold?” Meanwhile, Chez Spoonfully: “whoa, two days on the bench and that bread still isn’t defrosted” and “I wonder if I can make a convincing fruit salad for breakfast using only dried dates and zucchini?”

Which makes it sound like I’m envious of the bounty in the North — but I’m not. Winter harvest is still pretty juicy:

Bow before the pumpking!

This magnificent specimen was presented to us as a housewarming gift, and a beauty it is, too. We’re not cutting into it until we’ve seriously weighed up the many glorious avenues this fine piece could be channelled into. Soup? Pies? Roasted and tossed with couscous? Pumpkin and black bean chilli? Yes, yes, yes, oh god, please, yes.

This week has been fantastic and full of winter flavours: I’ve been living off my awesome hummus, on tortillas with roast pumpkin, pickled beets, gherkins, roast capsicums — any vegetable I can get my hands on. It’s winter and the world is retreating inwards, but as long as I have dried beans, pumpkins and pickles, I’m set.

I avoid shops and supermarkets the way dogs avoid fireworks. Most of my shopping happens at the farmers’ markets — so, of course, what’s on offer reflects the seasons. Winter seems to be rich in onions, beets, carrots, leeks — loads of root veggies, alliums, not to mention ALL PUMPKINS ALL THE TIME! Having said that, getting fresh salad-type stuff like tomatoes, capsicums, cucumbers and lettuce has never been a problem. God knows how the growers do it. Probably dark and deviant arts, which I’m happy to support.

I should really have a go at growing kitchen sprouts, in these chilly times when outdoor growing is slow and disappointing (although, a big loving shout-out to my silverbeet crop, which is bravely charging along, despite frosts and getting stepped on by accident with alarming frequency). Winter is chilly but not crippling, and the grey and grubby garden shots above don’t tell the whole story:

Fresh

Coriander seedlings, blithely ignoring the frosts…

Futureberries

…and one of several strawberry plants with oodles of new growth. Nobody tell these babies it’s winter, they’ll be so surprised they’ll pop their monocles.

{ 1 } Comments


  1. Fatal error: Uncaught Error: Call to undefined function ereg() in /home/thecutle/public_html/wp-content/themes/barthelme-cutlery/functions.php:178 Stack trace: #0 /home/thecutle/public_html/wp-content/themes/barthelme-cutlery/comments.php(34): barthelme_commenter_link() #1 /home/thecutle/public_html/wp-includes/comment-template.php(1535): require('/home/thecutle/...') #2 /home/thecutle/public_html/wp-content/themes/barthelme-cutlery/single.php(44): comments_template() #3 /home/thecutle/public_html/wp-includes/template-loader.php(106): include('/home/thecutle/...') #4 /home/thecutle/public_html/wp-blog-header.php(19): require_once('/home/thecutle/...') #5 /home/thecutle/public_html/index.php(17): require('/home/thecutle/...') #6 {main} thrown in /home/thecutle/public_html/wp-content/themes/barthelme-cutlery/functions.php on line 178